Home   »   Archive by category "events"

Archive for the events Category

Sustainable Places Conference
One of the greatest challenges that our societies have ever faced is how to drive energy efficiency at the building, district and city level. Sustainable Places is an International Conference held each year across Europe to gather scientists, researchers, and engineers, from both academia and industry to discuss the latest state-of-the-art advances in this area.

This year, its being held in Anglet, France and IES is involved in a big results workshop for FASUDIR, as well as presenting on work currently in progress on the iURBAN and NewTrend projects. While other projects RESSEEPE and Energy in Time are also hosting in-depth workshops.

The show aims to facilitate innovative solutions for renovation and new construction to ensure the long-term environmental sustainability of ever-growing, densifying urban areas, in a resource-constrained world. Information and Communications Technology (ICT), along with other key research domains (energy, materials, methods and practices, etc.) will be at the core of the conference.

Join us at the show if you’re heading along, or catch up with our post show blog.

FASUDIR Results Workshop
Thursday 30th June, 9am-12.30pm, Nick Purshouse

FASUDIR Linked Workshop/Paper: Historic Cities in Transition
Wednesday 29th June, 4.30-6.30pm

iUrban Paper Presentation
Thursday 30th June, 9am, Mike Oats

NewTrend Presentation: District Renewal Workshop
Wednesday 29th June, 11am-4pm Nick Purshouse

RESSEEPE Workshop: Public Building Retrofitting
Wednesday 29th June, 2-4pm

RESSEEPE Paper Presentation
“Innovative technologies for retrofitting: Coventry University as a Living Lab”
Wednesday 29th June 4.30pm

Energy in Time Workshop: Building Operations & Maintenance
Thursday 30th June, 9am-12.30pm

Daniel at ASHRAE Ireland
Firstly, I must congratulate all the new ASHRAE Ireland committee, who worked really hard alongside myself, to make our first event a great success. It took place in the heart of Dublin (Dublin Castle), on 9th February 2016, and was incredibly well attended, with over 80 representatives from a diverse group across the whole building services sector – from both industry and academia. In addition, 10 sponsoring organisations including IES were also present, representing building design, HVAC equipment, refrigeration and controls.

A varied agenda included talks from across the industry:
• ASHRAE Organisation and the Ireland Section: Frank Caul (Sirus), Ken Goodman (ASHRAE Sub-Region B Chair) & Dr. Bruce D. Hunn (ASHRAE)
• Commercial Building Performance: Dr. Bruce D. Hunn (ASHRAE)
• Building energy policy and research: Kevin O’Rourke and Dr. Daniel Coakley
• Industrial Refrigerants: Seamus Kerr (RSL Ireland)

Bruce Hunn, the headline ASHRAE Distinguished Lecturer, spoke about ‘Performance Measurement protocols for Commercial buildings’, giving an in-depth discussion on characteristic measures for energy, water and indoor environmental quality (IEQ), as well as best practice guidelines for the application of each. This talk covered many important aspects of performance measurement, including setting the objective (why is it measured?), the metric (what to measure and how?), and finally the outputs in terms of appropriate benchmarks or performance indicators. The talk covered the three levels of performance objectives – basic, intermediate and advanced, giving detailed examples for each case, utilising the ASHRAE HQ building in Atlanta as a case study. Click here to view the presentation slides.

ASHRAE Ireland
In the afternoon session, which focused on building policy and research, I introduced the concept of smart cities and smart buildings. My presentation illustrated how current IES research in this space is driving improved integration between systems, buildings, communities and cities. In particular, the talk focuses on solutions being developed through collaborative research projects and training networks, such as Horizon 2020 and Marie Curie, and how these are helping create the next generation of urban energy planners and engineering solutions capable of leveraging novel ICT technologies to improve design and operational efficiency. In particular, I highlighted my involvement in one of these projects – EINSTEIN, a Marie Curie IAPP project in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin, which aims to develop the next generation of optimised building controllers, through a combination of data-driven fault detection and prediction-based control optimisation. Click here to view the presentation slides.

Overall, the event was a great success for the launch of ASHRAE in Ireland, with a fantastic turnout, and positive feedback from attendees, sponsors and invited speakers and guests. It was great to see such a high level of interest and commitment from people from across the building services spectrum. We hope that this will lead to the growth of the organisation in Ireland, with further events already in planning, and growing interest in the formation of technical sub-committees among interested individuals and organisations.

 

Dublin Castle
Through my role with IES R&D, I’m lucky enough to find myself supporting the launch of the first ASHRAE Section in Ireland and am currently helping to organise its inaugural event. Taking place on 9th February at Dublin Castle, the conference will focus on commercial building energy performance, and will feature the ASHRAE Distinguished Lecturer, Dr. Bruce D. Hunn, who will lecture on measurement, evaluation and improvement of energy performance of commercial buildings. Additional talks will include recent developments in natural refrigerants, modelling of HVAC systems and controls, as well as building energy policy and regulation.

ASHRAE is an international organisation of around 53,000 members covering 132 nations, focussed on technical advancements in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration, and helping to promote sustainability in these areas. In June 2015, I helped establish ASHRAE Ireland, with the aim to promote the organisations goals to our current national membership, and help encourage networking of member groups and organisations under this common goal.

As well as being involved in the launch of ASHRAE Ireland I’m also a research fellow on EINSTEIN, a Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP) project, between IES and Trinity College Dublin (TCD). The aim of EINSTEIN is to formulate and integrate a number of advanced building control strategies; Controls which will not only help eradicate errors between ‘as-built’ and ‘as-designed’ conditions but also include predictive analysis of how the building should perform, taking into account future weather predictions and occupant use. The synergy between the project and the conference theme made it the perfect fit for me and for IES who are sponsoring the event.

The event already has an excellent line-up of speakers so far, with energy sector representatives from both industry and academia. Our very own Catherine Conaghan will be speaking on “Building Energy Modelling and Smart Building Control” covering commercial available solutions IES already has in the space as well as looking at EINSTEIN and other research projects ongoing in IES R&D under the theme of operations and smart building control.

I fully expect the event will be a great opportunity to create meaningful engagement on the energy issues facing individuals and companies, particularly in the face of falling energy prices and increasing importance of meeting demanding sustainability targets.

Read more about the event and sign up here. We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin Castle on 9th February.

Interoperate Between BIM and Energy Modeling

Posted: January 15, 2016 by , Category:BIM, events

BIM Energy Modeling DiagramOn the lead up to our free BIM4Analysis webinar taking place on Thursday 28th January, we’ll be publishing a series of blogs to preview some of the topics that will be covered during the session. First up is a post from our guest speaker Jean Carriere of Trailloop, who will be presenting the most recent thinking on his approach to producing building loads for systems sizing and energy modelling from an integrated modelling process.

Build clean models before exporting the gbXML file and avoid integration errors before they happen, yielding predictably good results across many applications.

The AEC industry is familiar with creating building loads for systems sizing and then producing energy models with the Performance Rating Method (ASHRAE 90.1 or NECB). Although these project deliverables are typically done independently from each other without any integration to the project’s architectural and MEP systems design.

The building loads are produced from an early snapshot of the building’s form and features, then the compliance energy model acts as an auditing tool when the design is complete. A framework that incorporates these familiar industry deliverables would improve the energy performance of any building, by integrating and using information effectively during the design process.

The objective is to create the building loads from the architectural design model and then use this information to design and right-size the HVAC systems. With a clear and robust framework for measuring and verifying energy performance indicators, the design team can make informed decision based on actionable metrics. This process is designed to promote iterative energy simulations in order to achieve certain energy performance targets, such as net zero and beyond.

In order to make this process work, it first starts with the integration of BIM for energy modeling applications. This is accomplished by exporting a good quality gbXML or IFC export file from a BIM project. These files can be imported into most energy modeling applications, which then creates a digital link between BIM and energy modeling. As the federated BIM project evolves in complexity and level of detail throughout the design process, the energy modeling integration link is lost, but the information parameters remain. If the geometry or spaces change after the integration, the modifications can be copied back using the 5 fundamental modeling techniques into the integration model and then re-integrated in order to maintain the BIM link between applications.

We can use these information parameters to exchange data between the two applications. That could be a third party defining space and component properties in Revit and sending that information down to the energy modeler. Or it could be the energy modeler producing building loads or systems data to be inserted within the relevant space and component parameters. This way the building’s information resides inside the BIM and the simulated data is accurately representing the architectural and mechanical/electrical design.

The process of exchanging information bi-directionally between BIM and third party application is where the UK is heading with their BIM mandate for 2016. They define level 2 BIM as “a single environment to store shared asset data and information; accessible to all individuals who are required to produce, use and maintain it.” In essence, we’re opening up a portal to move information between energy modeling and BIM applications. If you’ve maintained the integration model throughout the process, then exchanging information after an energy simulation is as simple as copy/pasting data in Excel, and in a few minutes your BIM project is filled with important and relevant data.

Want to find out more about Jean’s approach? Sign up now for our free IES Faculty BIM webinar.

Got a question you’d like to put to Jean or one of our IES BIM experts ahead of the webinar? There are a number of ways you can do this – submit your question here, tweet us using the #BIMfaculty hashtag or post on the IES Facebook page, and we’ll do our best to report back during the seminar. Questions and answers will be collated into an FAQ document which we’ll circulate after the event.

Einstein-project (2)EINSTEIN, one of our funded Research and Development projects is nearing the end of its second year, bringing us to the half way mark. And excitingly we’re starting to see some really interesting results.

EINSTEIN is a Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP) project, where knowledge is shared between Industry and Academic partners through a number of staff exchanges. The aim is to encourage entrepreneurship and to help to turn creative ideas into innovative products and processes.

Together with our project partners Trinity College Dublin (TCD), the aim of EINSTEIN is to formulate and integrate a number of advanced building control strategies. Controls which will not only eradicate errors between ‘as-built’ and ‘as-designed’ conditions but also include predictive analysis of how the building needs to perform, taking into account future weather predictions and occupant use.

From the work we’ve done to date, we’re starting to get see some really interesting results in relation to the three algorithms in development (fault detection, prediction and optimisation).

The results and key findings in project to date will be presented and discussed by the project team members as part of the Operational Energy Management of the Built Environment Seminar that IES is hosting with Trinity in the Guinness Storehouse on the Wednesday 18th November.

Plus, you can find out more about EINSTEIN on the project website. Keep checking back as we’re developing a new results section to keep you updated on progress as it’s made.

If you want to be included on our mailing list for quarterly EINSTEIN updates please contact events@iesve.com.

IES-Faculty-Review-of-current-Design-Guidance-

We were hugely encouraged by the attendance at last week’s Faculty and would like to thank everyone again for joining us and for your patience with the spatial availability! This Faculty is number 10 in our series and more popular than ever, surprising as we had been worried that the subject matter would perhaps fail to draw much interest. We were wrong!

In preparing the content the aim was to condense the vast amount of information into a digestible half day seminar. At the same time we aimed to identify opportunities for our customers in helping to address the requirements, add value. As a secondary objective we wanted to highlight efficiencies of using the Virtual Environment suite.

Naghman and I reviewed the literature including design guides, technical memoranda, applications manuals, regulatory and voluntary requirements for the 4 main building types selected – Educational, Commercial, Healthcare and Retail.

Not surprisingly the two main areas of literature pertain to Education and Healthcare and we noted a marked difference in the ‘structure’ of the information. Healthcare is organised with an overarching set of documents driving improvement forward whereas the schools information was a bit disjointed. Having said that the Education Funding Agency has provided an overarching set of requirements upon which funding depends. However, whilst the lighting design guidance relevant for all schools has been updated to reflect the EFA requirements, the ventilation, thermal comfort and IAQ has not.

As an addendum to this there is a working group, including IES, currently looking at updating Building Bulletin 101, the EFA requirements form part of this discussion. The timeframe is as yet undecided. If the EFA requirements are extended to all new schools and major refurbishment and adopted as standard this might help to drive improvement over time.

A common theme within the EFA requirements and the Healthcare standards is Performance In Use (PIU) – the move away from ticking Design Criteria boxes during design to closing the loop between design and operation. Something very close to our heart!

As always the Faculty provided a good opportunity for like-minded individuals to get together and share ideas, we have attempted to capture some of the discussion points below;

  • Politics get in the way of green/sustainability/energy conservation agenda, with the move away from the Green Deal and zero carbon targets for domestic dwellings. Incremental improvements in Building Regulations and the uncertainty this creates is an obstacle to innovation. If developers had longer term goals to achieve (e.g. zero carbon non-domestic target by 2019) they could build that into their investment portfolios and confidently innovate to deliver the targets over time. If they do not know which way things are going to go they are reluctant to invest in innovation which keeps the cost of innovation elevated.
  • Despite the move away from zero carbon in the UK there is a European Directive (Directive 2010/31/EU EPBD recast) for near zero energy public buildings from Jan 2019 onwards and that all new buildings are near zero-energy from January 2021. http://www.epbd-ca.eu/themes/nearly-zero-energy
  • Energy centres are commonplace in German cities which makes it easier for new developments to connect thereby taking advantage of the efficiencies these can offer. The London Plan is driving this and as a result we see more examples of district schemes – Kings Cross, Olympic Park and Crystal Palace amongst many others. This is the level of infrastructure and the sort of long term strategy required to really make a difference.
  • An audience member remarked that the design guidance for buildings is over complicated and how can we expect to measure this in reality once the building is occupied. Perhaps if we keep the requirements achievable and the metrics simple it would motivate building owners and their designers to consider the Performance In Use aspects more often. As it is it’s a costly and somewhat complex exercise.
  • Some of our audience claimed that they are being asked for TM54 assessments and Soft Landings on projects other than schools, which indicates perhaps an enlightened client.

We also had a few questions related to VE capability and application;

  • Q: Can the Priority Schools Building Programme Climate Based Daylight Modelling requirements be adequately demonstrated using Radiance despite the fact that blinds are not represented in Radiance?
  • A: Our view is that the correct approach is to assess the design first without blinds to get the baseline level of UDI performance. It is reasonable to assume that whenever the 3000 lux threshold is exceeded blinds or similar would be in operation to mitigate glare.Having said that we are looking to develop this capability and reduce the calculation time. We will also look into producing a Schools Navigator which pulls all of the different requirements into one place.
  • Q: Questions were raised about the implementation and applicability of ApHVAC.
  • A: We are seeing an increase in interest and use of ApHVAC in the UK, often in relation to TM54 and/or Soft Landings. My recommendation would be to have another look at the module. This auto size demo video from 2 years ago which suggests that robust sizing of plant can be carried out early in the design process. If you have questions or would like a demo please get in touch.

Due to the success of this Faculty we have decided to take the event to Glasgow on Tuesday 17th November so I look forward to seeing some of you there. You can get your free tickets here: http://ow.ly/TLsGC

Got a design guidance question you’d like to ask Sarah? Use the comments section below.

 

new-york building

BIM experts around the world are gearing up for the latest event in the Build Earth Live series: Build New York Live! Following the success of events in Newcastle, London, Qatar and Sydney, the 48-hour virtual design competition, organised by cloud technology company, Asite, will kick off at 12:00 p.m. EDT on Monday, September 21, 2015.

Through the power of collaborative working in the cloud and using a range of interoperable technologies, teams will demonstrate the benefits of an open BIM workflow in designing a multi-use development for an internationally known site.

The event’s headline sponsor, Nemetschek Vectorworks, Inc., have worked in close collaboration with IES over the years to provide access to high-quality building model and building site data exchange with energy analysis and modelling applications, using the IFC file format. The connection offers interoperability between Vectorworks Architect or Vectorworks Designer software and our own energy analysis suite of tools, and is just one example of the kind of technology that will prove invaluable to the teams competing in next month’s event. Find out more about the IES and Vectorworks IFC Connection here.

The team here at IES are no strangers to the competition itself and were honoured to receive the award for “Best use of BIM for technical assessment” as part of the BIM Unlimited team at Build Qatar Live 2012. You can read more about our experience here.

If you think you’ve got what it takes to compete, why not build your own team or join forces with an existing group for a chance to win a coveted Build Live award? Registration is open now.

BIM Long and Prosper (Infographic)

Posted: January 27, 2015 by , Category:BIM, events

Spock-BIM
Ever wondered how many Trekkie and BIM puns you could squeeze into one infographic? Well as our marketing team and BIM experts figured out this week… it’s quite a few.

We came to that conclusion after creating our light hearted new infographic illustrating BIM and Interoperability with the VE, which you can see in full here.

The infographic was put together to highlight our upcoming free BIM Faculty webinar on Thursday, 29th January (1-4pm) , where we’ll provide an update on some of the latest features related to interoperability and learnings from some of our customers as part of our BIM series.

Looking more closely at the BIM enabled analysis workflow and the benefits it can offer your projects, we’ll provide insight into what exactly is required for successful integration between popular drawing tools and the IESVE, how you can make this work efficiently, and the benefits to your projects once you’ve mastered this. We’ll present the latest hints and tips for improving geometry import for BIM analysis with an update on the new features we’ve introduced to enhance your BIM workflow.

We also have some guest speakers involved; Jean Carriere of Trailloop, Zahid Ashraf and Ross Thompson of CBG Consultants, who will each present an independent case study highlighting their experiences of BIM interoperability with IESVE.

So ready to join the crew? You can sign up for the webinar here. And remember, the IES Faculty seminars are fully interactive so we encourage you to get involved by asking questions or sharing ideas and experiences with our team and guest speakers. There are a number of ways you can do this – tweet us using the #BIMfaculty hashtag, post on the IES Facebook page or drop an email to our events team.
Join-the-crew

Are you ready for Greenbuild 2014?

Posted: October 20, 2014 by , Category:events, LEED, Modeling

As we gear up for Greenbuild this week in the cultural hub that is New Orleans, we’re asking attendees ‘Are you ready?’  

With stricter code compliance regulations such as Title 24 coming into place and voluntary rating systems  like LEED V4 and ASHRAE Standard 189 introducing more stringent performance based pre-requisites, it is becoming clear that the industry needs to be ready to use a performance based simulation approach across the entire building lifecycle.

Code Compliance such as Title 24 and DOE Federal Incentives, based on ASHRAE 90.1 and ASHRAE 140 mean that demonstrating compliance in more and more states now require a model based performance approach rather than a prescriptive one. At the same time, LEED V4 is putting much more emphasis on performance across design, commissioning and verification and becomes the new standard June 2015.

This year at our stand (#1509) at Greenbuild we’ll be showcasing how users of IESVE can use their VE model across the entire building lifecycle, from demonstrating code compliance through operation and retrofit. IES is the only solution to provide this one model appropriate for all approach, allowing you to achieve LEED V4, Title 24, M&V and Commissioning, all through the same VE model.

We’ll also be launching our brand new ERGON Cloud service at Greenbuild, allowing users to import, manage and interrogate real building schedules and use them in VE simulations. Find out more here and avail of the 20 free credits on offer.

And we’ll be presenting an interactive demonstration of our IES TaP for LEED tool as part of ‘To infinity and beyond: A tour of LEED® Online and other project team support tools.’ The session will take place in the Interactive Lounge on Wednesday, 11:00 am-12:30 pm. You can register here and take advantage of our IES TaP for LEED 2 for 1 special offer by emailing sales@iestap.com or calling 404.806.2018.

Check out our Greenbuild ‘Are you ready’ social cards below and let us know you’re ready by connecting with us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn. See you in New Orleans!

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
are-you-ready-ads-code
are-you-ready-ads-calibration
are-you-ready-ads-leed
are-you-ready-ads-monitoring
are-you-ready-ads-netgen
are-you-ready-ads-title24

Closing the Performance Gap

Posted: September 17, 2014 by , Category:Energy Performance, events

performance-Gap-blog-image
There has been a growing awareness for some time that many ‘low energy buildings’ use more energy than the designers thought they would. As energy costs have risen, this awareness has started to spread to building owners, who hear much about low energy buildings and subscribe to programmes that rate the design of the building, only to find that their ‘low energy design’ turns out to have a typical energy bill. The performance of low energy designs is often little better than that of an older building they have replaced, or supplemented.

There is a mismatch between the expectations around the performance of new buildings and the reality of the utility bills. This difference between expected and realised energy performance has come to be known as the ‘performance gap’. CIBSE TM:54

Join the IES Team in London on Wednesday 24th September (4pm – 6pm), for the return of the next instalment of our popular interactive Faculty series, where we explore the Performance Gap phenomenon in detail. We’ll discuss what we can do to improve the accuracy of our design modelling, with an insight into the newly released CIBSE TM:54. Following on we’ll discuss the advantages of Soft Landings and what recent advances in Building Simulation can allow you to use real building data to improve the Design Process of new buildings.

Can’t make the seminar in person? Don’t worry, we’ll be providing live updates throughout the event on our live twitter feed, using the #PerformanceGap hashtag. Not only can you follow our World Green Building Week event live but you can also play your part in the discussion taking place, by filling out this quick survey below and by putting your questions and issues to our team using the #PerformanceGap hashtag or the comments section of this blog post.

The Faculty seminars are a place for interaction among the industry and the more feedback that is provided, the better we can start to address the issues we are all facing. It’s time for us to close the #PerformanceGap.

« Older Entries  

Featured Video

Copyright © 2009 Integrated Environmental Solutions Limited. All rights reserved