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All Energy Comes to Town

Posted: April 29, 2016 by , Category:Research & Development

Glasgow (3)
Next week All Energy opens at the SECC for another year and we’re gearing up for all that it will bring. As we’re headquartered in Glasgow it’s great having such a forward looking event going on in our home town. And boy is Glasgow a great host city – not only does it have flourishing Smart City credentials, but it’s also renowned for the warm welcome it gives visitors.

This year our R&D division is particularly active at the show presenting on a number of projects: INDICATE, Energy in Time, EINSTEIN, NewTREND and IMPRESS.

Speaking as part of the Sustainable Cities conference stream in Alsh1, Aidan and Catherine are covering the following:

4 May 2016, 12:45 – 13:45, Quick Fire Technology Update
Towards the development of a virtual 3D city model: Dundalk, Ireland
Aiden Melia, Project Manager, IES

5 May 2016, 14:30 – 16:15, Sustainable and smart cities technology
Making real-time operational control of buildings a reality with 3D simulation
Catherine Conaghan, Senior Project Manager, IES

While Nick is presenting within the Energy Efficiency Quick Fire Seminar Theatre on 5th May.

11:45 | NewTREND: Next Generation district integrated building retrofit, Nick Purshouse, Project Manager, IES
12:00 | IMPRESS: Energy reducing pre-fabricated retrofit panels (BIM) integrated, Nick Purshouse, Project Manager, IES

Buzzwords 2016
January is traditionally the time for forward reflection. So inspired by what’s going on around us we’ve pulled together the top 5 buzzwords that we think our expert building analytics team at IES will be using across 2016.

The Force of COP21
May the Force of COP21 be with us all. While the agreement signed in Paris by all 196 nations of the world to pull together and attempt to reduce carbon emissions, thus limiting the onslaught of global warming and reducing air pollution worldwide, is a major step forward, the real work starts now.

Undoubtedly the biggest difference will be made by big business and governments, see our founder Don’s views on this. However, we also believe that each and every one of us must also do our bit by changing the way we live, work, travel and think; no matter where we are from or how rich we are.

The Glasgow Effect:
Ok so we might not use this across the whole year but it certainly got us talking in January and as it’s a year-long project there is sure to be more to come. For those of you who’ve not picked up on this yet, the topic of office banter all across Glasgow on Tuesday morning was Ellie Harrison and her Glasgow Effect project being awarded £15k by Creative Scotland. The artist will not leave the greater Glasgow Area for 1 year (except in the event of the ill-heath / death of close relative or friend), and it’s caused a real storm on social media.

The project was initially called Think Global Act Local and is not primarily about poverty or deprivation in the city, as many people have assumed, but about exploring the benefits and practicalities of localism for artists and communities. “By setting this one simple restriction to her current lifestyle, she intends to test the limits of a ‘sustainable practice’ and to challenge the demand-to-travel placed upon the ‘successful’ artist / academic. The experiment will enable her to cut her carbon footprint and increase her sense of belonging, by encouraging her to seek out and create ‘local opportunities’ – testing what becomes possible when she invests all her ideas, time and energy within the city where she lives.”

The artist has a strong interest in climate change, political activism and big data, and while the original project title is in some ways far more accurate, most people wouldn’t have looked twice at a project named ‘Think Global Act Local’. But it got us thinking about the role of local and community in our personal and professional lives. It’s a global problem, but there’s action that can be taken by us all at a local level to combat it. Read more at our Blog.

BIM4Analysis:
With the UK Government mandate for BIM Level 2 deadline fast approaching this year, and as a technology company in the sustainable building analysis arena we felt it was essential to educate and engage the industry on the important role performance analysis has to play in the BIM process. The concept of creating and capturing information during design for use in operation is key to achieving Low Zero Carbon buildings. This time last year we started an educational campaign named ‘BIM4Analysis’ to engage with the industry and bring performance metrics front and centre to the BIM movement which is what the Government strategy is aimed at.

2016 is going to see us develop on this, demonstrating our BIM enabled analysis workflow alongside customers through various events and publications, including Ecobuild and BIM Prospects 2016. We’ve also got the next instalment of our popular IES Faculty BIM webinar series taking place at the end of January (details coming soon). This event will provide an update on our BIM4Analysis strategy plus interoperability development work that will help you on your BIM journey.

Big Data:
Other industries are already capturing and using big data to their advantage – but buildings are lagging behind. Imagine what you could do with real metrics instead of big assumptions. It’s all linked to Smart Buildings, the Internet of Things and other digital developments. Data in buildings can be generated by a wide variety of sources and can be used to understand behaviour, assess performance, improve market competitiveness, allocate resources and so on. However, historically it has been difficult and expensive to collect this data, and its variety in quality, structure and format made it difficult to use, sometimes for example requiring the manual transfer of data from paper records into digital systems.

Mind The Performance Gap:
We’ve been banging on about this for ages now but it’s an issue which requires much more understanding and attention. We’re expecting the issue to gain momentum in 2016, especially as the UKGBC has announced a new research project in the area.

The Performance Gap is a well-documented disconnect between the design and compliance models of buildings and the reality of how they perform. Our work to date has focused on the importance of understanding the difference between design, compliance and actual building performance models, as covered in this video from our faculty event. As well as researching new technological advances in using operational data combined with 3D modelling across building design, handover and operation to deliver intelligent energy efficiencies, alongside healthy and comfortable buildings.

Glasgow
It’s only the first week of January and already controversy has hit Glasgow. The topic of office banter on Tuesday morning was Ellie Harrison and her Glasgow Effect project being awarded £15k by Creative Scotland. The artist will not leave the greater Glasgow Area for 1 year (except in the event of the ill-heath / death of close relative or friend), and it’s already caused a storm on social media.

“By setting this one simple restriction to her current lifestyle, she intends to test the limits of a ‘sustainable practice’ and to challenge the demand-to-travel placed upon the ‘successful’ artist / academic. The experiment will enable her to cut her carbon footprint and increase her sense of belonging, by encouraging her to seek out and create ‘local opportunities’ – testing what becomes possible when she invests all her ideas, time and energy within the city where she lives.”

Personally I find it hard to criticise a project that hasn’t produced anything yet, especially when I don’t know anything about the artist and her intentions. So I looked her up to find out more and discovered she has a strong interest in climate change, political activism and big data.

According to the Herald, and Ellie herself the project was initially called Think Global Act Local and is not primarily about poverty or deprivation in the city, as many people have assumed, but about exploring the benefits and practicalities of localism for artists and communities. And, so with COP21 fresh in my mind I can’t help hoping that some of this project’s outcomes will shine a light on how local communities can start to address the many challenges of keeping global warming at or below 2°C.

The COP21 agreement signed in Paris at the end of last year was a declaration by all 196 nations of the world to pull together and attempt to reduce carbon emissions, thus limiting the onslaught of global warming and reducing air pollution worldwide. While undoubtedly the biggest difference will be made by big business and governments, see our founder Don’s views on this, I also believe that each and every one of us must also do our bit by changing the way we live, work, travel and think; no matter where we are from or how rich we are.

I don’t normally take directly from another source but this article in Envirotech resonated so well I couldn’t rewrite. Here are just some things it suggests you can do to reduce air pollution in your area and curb climate change on a global scale.

  • Conserve energy. It might sound obvious, but turning off lights when not in use, switching off appliances, taking shorter showers, only boiling enough water in the kettle for your purposes, etc. – all of these things add up to dramatically reduce your carbon footprint. If you live in Glasgow City you can use the Energy App we developed for the City Council as part of its Smart City initiative.
  • Get some exercise. Walking or cycling to and from work or to the shops is not only good for you, it also means one less car on the road! This means one less exhaust spitting out harmful fumes and one less contributing factor to air pollution.
  • Take public transport. For longer distances, the British network of buses and trains is sufficiently developed to offer flexible routes to most destinations, especially in larger cities. Taking the bus can also be far more cost-effective than owning and maintaining a car, especially when petrol prices are factored in.
  • Drive responsibly. If you really must take the car, ensure you drive it in a responsible manner. This means cutting out unnecessary idling, increasing fuel efficiency by driving at optimal speeds, keeping the pressure on your tyres inflated and generally conducting routine maintenance.
  • Recycle and reuse. Instead of buying a new item when the old one becomes worn or dysfunctional, try to repair it. Recycle as much of your consumed produce as possible. Before throwing away, consider whether it can be reused.
  • Buy environmentally-friendly. Steer clear of products which contain many chemicals, solvents or volatile organic compounds (VOCs), choosing water-based paints and other cosmetics and environmentally-friendly approved products in general.
  • Make your voice heard. Take part in environmental protests, sign petitions and join campaigns to lobby for more environmental practices in your local community, in government and among big business.

The thing is, communities can and are coming together to make a difference, whether through local generation schemes, car-pooling, community gardens or many other like-mined programmes. And there undoubtedly must, and will, be more opportunities in the future for communities to take a bottom up approach to becoming more sustainable in the way we approach energy-use, waste and life in general.

Ellie’s original project title is in some ways far more accurate, but most people wouldn’t have looked twice at a project named ‘Think Global Act Local’. The phrase has been used in various contexts, including planning, environment, education, mathematics, and business, and even has its own Wikipedia page. It makes absolute sense when you apply it to climate change – it’s a global problem, but there’s action that can be taken by us all at a local level to combat it – thinking globally and acting locally.

In the end, I might not like the work Ellie produces for the Glasgow Effect, we will see. But for me it’s already been an opportunity to reflect on the role of local and community in our lives and has introduced me to projects and ideas I wouldn’t ordinarily have come across – Ellie’s own Radical Renewable Art + Activism Fund (RRAAF) to use a wind turbine to generate renewable energy and fund a ‘no strings attached’ grant for art-activist projects and a big bang data exhibition she was involved in. Both of which resonate personally and professionally.

So hate it or support it, Ellie’s Glasgow Effect project has stirred up a lot of feelings, debate and unfortunately abuse. It has also inspired a lot of social media ‘art’ in retaliation and hopefully also made us stop and think a bit. Where will it go from here, who knows, but I’m certainly interested to find out.

GCC-case-study
We’ve recently had the pleasure of being involved with the creation of the latest IET (Institute of Engineering Technology) technical briefing. Covering the “Challenges and Opportunities of Data-Driven Systems for Building, Community and City-Scale Applications”, it was right up our street.

Our R&D department invests a third of our turnover in looking to the future: on how digital technology can be used within a Smart Built Environment. Our belief is that Buildings, the main connectors between citizens, transport, energy, health, water and waste in a community, need to be at the core of a Smart City approach.

The Urban Lifecycle is critical to reducing energy costs and tackling climate change.

  • Smart Cities – clustering energy needs to create smart communities
  • Master Planning – driving a smart urban lifecycle
  • Building Control – making buildings as smart as our cars
  • Building Design – ensuring sustainable designs live up to expectation
  • Building Operation and Retrofit – getting existing buildings to stop wasting energy

Today, outcomes from our R&D department are already starting to make a difference. We’re using operational data and our unique SCAN technology to bridge the performance gap between design and operation; helping facilities managers reduce energy consumption. You can read the case study we produced for IET on the Proof of Concept study we did with Glasgow City Council here: http://www.theiet.org/sectors/built-environment/files/glasgow-cc-casestudy.cfm.

Data has always played a profound role in the decision-making and engineering management processes within the built environment, whether at building, community or city-scale. The IET Briefing which this case study is part of reviews the key challenges and opportunities for the application of digital technologies in the smart built environment – view it here: http://www.theiet.org/sectors/built-environment/resources/digital-technology.cfm.

We look forward to continuing to engage and raise awareness in this important field.

Developing the VE: Meet Software Engineer Tom

Posted: February 5, 2015 by , Category:careers

Tom-blog
In this week’s blog post we go behind the scenes at IES and meet one of our software developers to find out what it’s like working at IES and being part of the team that creates the Virtual Environment. So everybody meet Tom, our Anglo-French software engineer who has been working at IES since July 2013. We sat down with Tom to ask him the following questions…

What attracted you to this profession and how long have you been a software developer?
Growing up I was always interested in graphic design, 3D imagery and computer games. I loved being surrounded by gadgets and technology – which was encouraged by my dad, who as a photography lecturer would bring home photography tools and computer programs that I could spend hours inspecting and working out. I also loved animated films like Toy Story and I was fascinated by how computer code could be used to create this striking imagery. I was keen to find out how it was done…

It was this interest in the technical side of things that influenced my decision to get into computing. I went to the University of Angers in France to complete a degree in Computer Science and then followed that with a Master’s in computer graphics at the University of Lyon I. My Masters in computer graphics allowed me to specialise in software development applied to 3d computer graphics, 3d geometry and image processing. I finished it in 2008 and have now been working as a developer for 7 years.

What does your role at IES involve?
At IES, I work as a software engineer as part of the “Urban” team. In a nutshell, my job is to design and implement software components and algorithms which fulfil a set of requirements for a given project.
In practice, this also involves:
–    Reviewing requirement and specification documents and providing feedback.
–    Writing technical specification documents and reports.
–    Prototyping given features or technologies.
–    Taking part in development and project meetings.
–    Providing input and reporting progress to project managers.
–    Reviewing other team members’ code.

What project are you currently working on?
At the moment I am working on a R&D project called INDICATE, which is a prototype for a new interactive tool to help transform cities into smart cities. It will provide assessment of the interactions between buildings, the electricity grid, Electric Vehicle grid and Renewable/ICT technologies so the knock-on effect of changes can be understood within the urban context.

It’s a really interesting time to be working at IES as we go from looking at the energy of single buildings to also analysing cities and communities. I enjoy the technical challenges that arise in this area, as working with a group of buildings means more data to handle and visualise, more calculations and more complex interactions.

GFC_Bing

What tools do you use?
The main tools I use at IES are Microsoft Visual Studio, Perforce for version control and Sublime Text as my text editor. We work for the most part in Windows. In terms of languages, I use mainly C++, Python and JavaScript.

What software/tools/website could you not live without in your role?
It would be near impossible to live without a good debugger such as the one in Visual Studio or those available now in modern web browsers for JavaScript.

Also, an excellent resource when faced with a specific technical problem is the Q&A site stackoverflow.com. Often someone else will have faced the same problem before you!

What contribution to IES are you most proud of?
I’d have to say my work on the Glasgow Future Cities Project, a web platform and app that was developed to allow building owners (domestic and commercial) in Glasgow to understand the energy consumption of their buildings and to suggest ways of reducing this consumption. The app and web portal, which are coming soon, will show the city’s energy performance at both district and building level.

I was responsible for how these energy performance results were viewed by the user. I created an application to view the results over the whole city in 3D and to display the energy performance of the buildings at district and neighbourhood level.

What do you like most about working at IES?
The best thing about working at IES? It has to be the opportunity we get here to create innovative software. There are a lot of new projects and products being created at IES at the moment. It’s also very rewarding to know that these tools we create can then be used to make a real impact on the planet’s future and the fight against climate change.

I really enjoy the R&D aspect of the job as well. I like the problem solving involved and having time to go and research the best course of action or technology in order to make something work for a particular project.
Tom-blog-2

What advice would you give to someone who wants to become a software engineer?
Firstly, it’s a very good time to follow this career path as there are lots of opportunities available and
interesting technologies to work with.

My advice to someone starting off would be to not get too fixated on a specific language or tool. First understand the concepts, then you can apply them effectively in any language.

Outside of IES, what do you do for fun?
I enjoy hanging out with friends at the bars and restaurants that Glasgow has to offer and taking the time to explore other parts of Scotland, whether it be a day at the Fringe in Edinburgh or a trip up north to the highlands.

I also like to cycle, travel around Europe and at the moment I’m learning German – tschüss!

Interested in becoming a software engineer at IES in a position that gives you freedom and flexibility and allows you to work with the latest technologies to develop new and sophisticated products? Keep an eye on the job section of our website for upcoming positions or feel free to send your CV over to careers@iesve.com.

Sporting Sustainability

Posted: July 22, 2014 by , Category:IES TaP, Sustainability, Uncategorized


stadium-roof
With the World Cup ending and the Commonwealth Games just about to begin we thought it would be apt to take a brief look at how global sporting events are doing their bit for the environment…

Over the years sporting events across the globe have noticeably stepped up their game in terms of sustainability. The recent 2012 London Olympics boasted a saving of the equivalent of over 400,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide due to its sustainable practices, whilst the imminent Commonwealth Games in Glasgow this year, just last month received its certificate for achieving ISO 20121, the international standard for Sustainable Event Management, confirming its commitment to be a truly sustainable Commonwealth Games.

This year’s FIFA World Cup was no exception with the final match being powered purely by solar energy. And the lights certainly didn’t go out on Germany. Not only were they victorious in winning the Cup, the country has shown a true commitment to the world’s sustainability agenda by recently announcing its investment in the 100 Smart Cities initiative in India.

And looking on to the next World Cup to be held in Russia, plans are already under way to raise the bar for sustainable construction design in the country by designing stadiums to BREEAM standard. Using state of the art cloud-based project management technology IES TaP, three of the stadiums (Samara, Volgograd and Nizhny Novgorod) are on track to achieve BREEAM ratings. BREEAM expert, Glenn Miles recently wrote an interesting article on the benefits of using project management systems as opposed to traditional methods, which you can read here.

It’s encouraging to see that such large scale, global events are putting sustainability at the top of their agendas. These events affect and reach millions of people and it is important that the messages on protecting the environment are promoted as much as possible. It’s clear that everyone is still not fully aware of the dangers of climate change and the more that is done to raise awareness and encourage people to be more responsible towards the environment, the more chance we have of mitigating the potentially devastating effects.

Glasgow Future City

Posted: February 21, 2014 by , Category:Research & Development, Smart City

glasgow-future-cities

There’s no doubt 2014 is going to be a big year for Glasgow; the Commonwealth Games, the MTV Europe Awards, the Ryder Cup and the Independence Referendum.

But 2014 is also the year that Glasgow gets ‘smart’…

At the start of 2013, Glasgow City Council won the Future Cities Demonstrator competition, securing a £24 million fund from the Technology Strategy Board to spend on projects and technologies to help “make life in Glasgow smarter, safer and more sustainable”. With the IES headquarters based in Glasgow, we were keen to be involved in this Future City project.

IES is now working with Glasgow City Council to develop an online system which will enable citizens to evaluate the energy efficiency of their dwellings and get recommendations of possible improvements, including retrofit solutions, renewables and other energy conservation measures.

We will develop a 3D web portal that will allow users to view the city’s energy performance at both district and building level. A mobile app will also be created for building and home owners to understand their energy use, examine simple energy conservation measures to help them reduce their consumption and provide them with potential retrofit solutions that will be applicable to their buildings.

The app will act as a gateway between users and technology suppliers and will ultimately facilitate city-scale assessments of energy use. The importance of providing a means to conduct the latter cannot be overstated, in terms of the associated potential economic and environmental benefits for Glasgow.

This is an exciting project for IES and Glasgow, and one that continues to move the focus from the building to the city. You can visit the R & D section of our website to find out about our other research projects that are exploring how cities can operate intelligently; in order to benefit its inhabitants and our environment.

2014 – let’s make it a smart one.

scotland_america_flagScotland has given the world many things – the telephone, the television, Scotch whisky, Irn Bru, tartan, and of course; Integrated Environmental Solutions. Our CEO Don will be flying the Scottish flag this week as he has been invited to New York to participate in a panel debate on sustainable cities with the American-Scottish Foundation on April 5th. Celebrating Scotland-Tartan week, the event is to showcase Our Energy Future: The Power of Partnerships in America and Scotland.

IES was formed in Scotland by Managing Director Dr Don Mclean in June 1994. The roots of the company go back to 1979 when the 1973 energy crisis, the three-day week, power cuts and predictions that oil would run out by 2000 were all high in the public’s consciousness. Against this backdrop, Don started his PHD work in detailed simulation of renewable energy devices at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.  Don’s time at Strathclyde, along with subsequent research and commercial activity consolidated three fundamental observations that IES is built on:

  • Buildings are major consumers of energy and they have to be made more efficient to cut CO2 emissions, conserve fossil fuels and preserve the environment for future generations.
  • Buildings are generally designed on experience and simplistic performance calculations even though it has been proven that the use of performance based building simulation can achieve much better performing buildings that consume significantly less energy.
  • Pre-IES building performance tools were too complex to use and remained in the hands of academics making very little impact on mainstream commercial design.

Although our roots are Scottish, the outlook at IES has always been global. We understand that the problem of increasing C02 emissions is a global problem; not a local one. And that’s why we now have offices across the world in Glasgow, Dublin, Atlanta, Vancouver, Melbourne and Pune {India}. Our ties with America have always been strong – we opened a Boston office in 2004 and have had an office in San Francisco and IES consultants in Minnesota and north of the border in Vancouver.

Our ambition to collaborate within America took another step forward last year when IES acquired North American consulting firm BVM Engineering (BVME), who now act as our South Atlantic Division in Atlanta.

So as far as IES are concerned, partnerships between America and Scotland have never been stronger, with the future looking particularly bright…

We’ll toast a dram to that!

I’ve just returned from a week-long trip to Glasgow, in bonnie Scotland – where it rained for an estimated 92% of the time! I’m happy to report that these damp days did not spoil my trip as I was in the city to finalise the deal that sees BVM Engineering become a new division of IES.

BVM Engineering, of whom I am the founder of, will now become the first base for IES in the southern states. We’re an experienced group of engineers and LEED APs that have accumulated many years of experience working on projects across the globe. Our skillset is one that will complement IES, and as highly experienced LEED consultants and LEED reviewers, we’d like to bring this practical experience to bear enhancing the current LEED capabilities of the <Virtual Environment> software.

Our expertise will also reinforce the work IES consultants currently undertake on behalf of their <Virtual Environment> software customers; supporting delivery of their client’s projects through a combined offering of consulting services, software support and training.

So what attracted us to join forces with IES? Well I have known IES CEO Don MacLean for over eight years now, and during that time our relationship has grown due to a shared

Battled recommended quite. & www.geneticfairness.org product 99 threw viagra -, immediately virtually.

passion for sustainable building design and a common vision for the essential role performance analysis plays in the process. I’ve also had eight years to get accustomed to the Scottish accent too… the food, however, is another story…

As you know, my sustainability practice has been rooted in building energy analysis (“modelling”) and I have been teaching for years that the way we analyse buildings, as a separate entity from the designer, has to change if we are to truly impact the sustainability of the built environment. The suite of analysis tools IES has and is developing, is intended to facilitate detail-appropriate analysis at all stages of design by the true ‘designers’ of the building. Hence, our move to join forces with IES!

As long term users of IES software we know a lot about the company and their culture, and it is one that we are all very excited about being part of. My new colleagues at the Glasgow HQ couldn’t have made me feel more welcome, and getting a chance to sit down with people across the company really opened my eyes at the exciting times ahead for IES in North America.

Well now that the boxes have been ticked and the deal has been done, it is time for the real work to begin. We’ll be sure to keep you posted on our progress…

If you have been keeping up to date with our latest news stories you’ll know that we recently had a visit from the renowned Danish expert Jorgen Erik Christensen and two of his Masters students.

On Wednesday 25th April Jorgen, Espen and Peder appeared bright and early at our Glasgow Headquarters where they spent the day with our Director Craig Wheatley and Project Leader, Special Projects, Michael Pollock. Their intentions were to discover the UK analysis model and understand the process concerning simulation in particular of new, more complicated buildings and from this determine lessons learned to take back to Denmark.

Writing their master project on the future use of energy simulation programs in Denmark, the students saw this visit as a great opportunity to understand first-hand how the IES Virtual Environment (IES VE) software is used within a UK commercial building design process, and how the elements related to UK energy conservation regulations (Part L & EPCs) are incorporated.

Michael Pollock, our expert in this area was only too happy to share his expertise with our Danish friends. Talking them through the UK regulations and showing them how we set up advanced software solutions to meet UK compliance, the students were able to discover the challenges and begin to understand how this process could be adapted for Denmark.

With our new IESVE 2012 due to be released shortly, Michael and Craig were able to give the trio a sneak peek into some of the new features that would benefit them substantially with projects they were working on. Michael observed “Our visitors were wowed with the advanced capabilities of the Virtual Environment, it really seemed to go above and beyond what they had expected”.

Like all good students Espen and Peder had done their homework and had read many of the papers and presentations written by our experts. They were particularly interested in the IBPSA paper based on the Venture Building which is situated in the same campus as our headquarters and were keen to pay it a visit.

In feedback from Jorgen, Espen and Peder they said…

“Based on our meeting with IES we feel confident that the ever increasing demand for energy savings in buildings can be met through intelligent design and analysis of same. This is where IES<VE> comes into the picture; by integrating most of the design phases and Compliance certification into a single simulation tool, the workflow of the project is made more efficient, while at the same time giving detailed energy consumption estimations in order to further optimize the building design. This impression was confirmed by meetings with Buro Happold, Hulley & Kirkwood and Wallace Whittle.”

Craig rounds up the success of the visit…

“We were absolutely delighted to welcome Jorgen and his students from DTU to the UK.  IES have a strong user base in Demark, thanks in part to DTU’s adoption of the Virtual Environment in their teaching. It was a pleasure to share the experience of IES and our customers in the use of our VE Compliance software for the EPBD driven UK Part L & Section 6 building regulations and energy performance certification.”

 

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